Flowerdale Nursery  & Landscaping
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Flowerdale Nursery & Landscaping


Hydrangea

Starting Right- Here are a few tips to ensure a successful planting in Orange County.

Choose a site- most hydrangeas need a shady spot in the garden. This will usually be found on the north side of the house or under trees. The east side of the house can also be used but the flowers don’t last as long and plants tend to burn in the summer sun. Any afternoon sun will damage or kill a hydrangea although along the coast, they can withstand much more sun than inland.

The right Varieties- Let flowerdale’s experts help you select varieties. Some are bigger than others and have different flower forms. Plan ahead and choose the ones you like.

Plant it right- ask for a copy of our planting guide. It will show you how to plant properly to ensure a healthy plant from the start. Be sure to use a acidic planting mix instead of regular planting mix.

VARIETIES

Bluebird- Rich blue on blue lacecap flowers growing 4-6’

Buttons n’ Bows- Large clusters of deep pink blooms with each petal edged in white. 3-4’ high and wide

Endless Summer- Large cluster of Blue or Pink flowers depending on soil ph. Grows about 5’.

Lanarth White- Lacecap with white to pink center surrounded by large white flowers. Grows 3-4’

Merrit’s Beauty- Carmine-red flowers in large clusters growing 4-6’

Nikko Blue- Rich blue flowers in clusters growing 4-6’

Pink Elf- A true dwarf! Only 18”tall and 24” wide with rich pink flowers

Pink n’ Pretty- Showy pink flower clusters grows 4-6’

Red n’ Pretty- Showy red flowers growing 4-6’

Hydrangea Companion Plants

Plants around hydrangeas should not be too aggressive and tolerate frequent water and fertilizer. Remember most hydrangea will get quite large, so allow plenty of room for future growth. Companion plants should have foliage and flowers that compliment hydrangeas and not draw attention away from them.

Flowerdale’s recommendations of companion plants:

Azaleas- Many varieties available and many colors to chose from. Both sun and shade varieties may be planted near hydrangea. Try to choose varieties that bloom in winter while hydrangea is resting.

Camellias- Plant shade varieties are best near hydrangeas. These large, evergreen shrubs will bloom in winter while hydrangeas are resting. Most will grow as tall or taller so be sure to situate them towards the back of the planting area.

Ferns- Lots of sizes and textures available. Choose the smaller, finer textured foliage to contrast with the big bold foliage of your hydrangea.

Ground Cover- Low and spreading like Baby’s Tears, to taller clumps of grassy type plants like Mondo and Lily Turf, all add texture and interest without competing for color.

Bedding Plants- Add more winter color with Cyclamen and Primrose. During the summer months use Impatiens and Begonias. Other perennials can also be used to add interest. Try Lamium, Ajuga, Vinca minor and more! Ask us to show you what’s in stock now.

ORANGE COUNTY

HYDRANGEA CARE CALENDAR

January- Most hydrangeas will look “wintery” this time of year. It is normal for them to lose most or all of their leaves and look a bit unhappy right now. Hydrangeas will need no fertilizer this month but you need to apply Aluminum Sulfate to help keep blue flowering plants dark blue. Be careful not to overwater as rainfall may provide most of the water requirements.

February- Plants will still look somewhat discolored, but new foliage may be already beginning to appear. Never cultivate under any hydrangea. Continue to be cautious with watering as rainfall may provide most of the water requirements. Apply Iron Plus to help correct iron chlorotic leaves.

March- Many varieties are now putting on new growth and a few may even have some flower buds. For each foot of plant height, apply ¼ cup of Nurseryman’s Camellia/Azalea plant food evenly around each plant. Water according to soil type and moisture content of the soil; in well prepared, well draining soil this may be once per week. This is the start of hydrangea shopping season!

April- Most hydrangeas look pretty good this month and should have lots of buds or even flowers. For each foot of plant height, apply 1/2cup of Nurseryman’s Mineral Soil Conditioner evenly around each plant, no other fertilizing is necessary. Water according to soil type and moisture content of the soil; in well prepared, well draining soil this may be once per week.

May- Apply 1/2cup of Nurseryman’s Camellia/Azalea plant food evenly around each plant. Never cultivate under any hydrangea. Remove dead flowers periodically to keep plants looking their best. Water according to soil type and moisture content of the soil; in well prepared, well draining soil this may be once per week. Flowerdale usually has its best selection this month.

June- Mulch each hydrangea with a 2 to 3 inch layer of Nurseryman’s Acid Planting Mix applied evenly around each plant but not contacting the main trunk.  Never cultivate under any hydrangea. Water according to soil type and moisture content of the soil; in well prepared, well draining soil this may be once or twice per week.

July- For each foot of plant height, apply 1/2cup of Nurseryman’s Mineral Soil Conditioner evenly around each plant. Leach accumulating salts out of soil by flooding the root zone with a slow, very deep, application of water; repeated two or three times if necessary. Water according to soil type and moisture content of the soil; in well prepared, well draining soil this may be once or twice per week.

August- Apply 1/2cup of Nurseryman’s Camellia/Azalea plant food evenly around each plant. Never cultivate under any hydrangea. Remove faded flowers and mist the foliage periodically to keep plants looking their best. Water according to soil type and moisture content of the soil; in well prepared, well draining soil this may be once or twice per week.

September- Leach accumulating salts out of soil by flooding the root zone with a slow, very deep, application of water. Add additional Nurseryman’s Acid Planting Mix around each plant to maintain a two to three inch layer. Water according to soil type and moisture content of the soil; in well prepared, well draining soil this may be once or twice per week.

October- For each foot of plant height, apply 1/2cup of Nurseryman’s Mineral Soil Conditioner evenly around each plant. Leach accumulating salts out of soil by flooding the root zone with a slow, very deep, application of water; repeated two or three times if necessary. Water according to soil type and moisture content of the soil; in well prepared, well draining soil this may be once or twice per week.

November- Water needs are much less this month. With cool weather, its not unusual to see numerous yellow leaves and some thinning of the plant. There may even be a few faded flowers. Its time to prune! Remove any thin, weak or unproductive stems. Cut one third of the oldest stems to the ground level. Cut the strong stems that are left down to a good pair of buds. Apply aluminum sulfate for best blue color next year.

December- Plants may lose all or most of their leaves this month. Be careful not to over water, as rainfall may provide a portion of the water requirements. Protect from drying Santa Ana winds if exposed on a north-east corner of the building.

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